From: http://news.scubatravel.co.uk

Tagging and tracking leatherback sea turtles has produced new insights into the turtles’ behavior in a part of the South Pacific Ocean long considered an oceanic desert. According to researchers at Stanford University, the new data will help researchers predict the turtles’ movements in the ever-changing environment of the open ocean, with the goal of reducing the impact of fishing on the endangered leatherback population. Read More

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How long can you stay underwater at 50 feet? To answer this question in the past, a diver would simply reach for his recreational dive tables. As in most technology-dependent activities, however, the state of the art in scuba diving is constantly evolving. These days, it is common to see a diver use his dive computer instead of dive tables to calculate how long he can stay underwater. Some scuba training organizations, such as SDI (Scuba Diving International), even train students to use dive computers during the open water course.

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Orangeville woman suffers leg and arm wounds

Wednesday, February 2, 2011 |


A Canadian nurse attacked by a shark in Cancun, Mexico, Monday morning has serious injuries to her left arm and leg but is recovering well in hospital. Read More:

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/02/02/nb-canadian-shark-attack-recovering.html#ixzz1CuTI5d3d

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After the first confirmed sighting of a lionfish in Belize in December 2008, ECOMAR began working with the Belize Fisheries Department to raise awareness on the problems that are anticipated as a result of the increasing number of lionfish in the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve Ecosystem.

The Belize Lionfish Project came about, where fishermen, tour guides and the public were being taught about the invasive and venomous creature. Monthly lionfish tournaments and workshops have been held as well.   To read the full story

Island Diver catch

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From: www.tbnweekly.com

INDIAN ROCKS BEACH – Claims by a local treasure hunter that there is a century-old shipwreck off our shores got a boost from a former diver in the area.

“I’ve seen that wreck,” said Joe Mecko, of Madeira Beach, after reading a story on the subject in the Beach Beacon. Read More

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From: www.cairns.com.au

MANY dive into the depths of the Great Barrier Reef to experience the colourful underwater world, but for Ed Przybylek, feeling the coral gave him a new sensation.

Mr Przybylek, 59, has been blind since he was 10, but it did not stop the American tourist from plunging into the sea for an introductory dive with Quicksilver instructor James Hight.

After surfacing from the dive, Mr Przybylek could not stop grinning.

“It was like flying down there,” he said. More

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Thailand is closing 18 dive sites to give its coral a chance to recover.

The dive sites closed include East of Eden in the Similans  Ao Pakkad, Ao Suthep, Ao Mai Ngam, Koh Stork and Hin Kong in the Surin Islands and Hin Klang near Koh Phi Phi . Over 80% of the coral at each site had been damaged, National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department chief Sunan Arunnoparat said. More

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Divers have described their discovery of a WWI German U-boat that historians believe was destroyed in 1919.

All 27 crew on board the UC42 died when the submarine sank at the entrance to Cork Harbour on 10 September 1917.

It had been laying mines when an explosion was heard.

A team of five amateur divers from Cork discovered the submarine in good condition in 27m of water just off Roches Point on 6 November after a 12-month search. More

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Oceanic Worldwide and Scuba Schools International announce new Unique Specialty Courses for Dive Computers

Tustin, CA, January 19, 2011 -DiveNav, the developer of the innovative eDiving® scuba diving simulator and the DiveComputerTraining® service, applaud  this new initiative recently announced jointly by Oceanic Worldwide and Scuba School International.

The goal of the Oceanic Computer Diver – SSI Unique Specialty Courses is to train recreational divers to properly use model-specific Oceanic Personal Dive Computers when performing recreational – non decompression – dives using air.  Each program includes an independent online learning session and open water session.  The program can be taught by any current and insured SSI Oceanic Computer Diver Specialty Instructor.  SSI Instructors can download Oceanic Computer Diver Distinctive Specialty Instructor Manuals for the several Oceanic Dive Computers by going to www.OceanicWorldwide.com/DistinctiveSpecialty/SSI

“We have been working for quite some time with the leading manufacturers of scuba equipment and certification agencies, and are extremely pleased by this new initiative that further validates our value proposition”, said Alberto Mantovani, President and CEO of DiveNav, Inc., “thanks to our platform technology, we can safely and cost effectively create educational material and training scenarios for dive computers, closed circuit rebreathers, remotely operated vehicles and any other high tech product that could be used underwater”, he concluded.

The learning session of each SSI Unique Specialty Courses is composed by the related model-specific dive computer online class developed by DiveNav and available online at DiveComputerTraining.com

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About DiveNav

DiveNav Inc., headquartered in Tustin, Calif., is an innovative company developing the leading-edge  eDiving® scuba diving simulator and the innovative DiveComputerTraining® service.

eDiving enables the user friendly exploration of our oceans by the recreational and educational communities.

DiveComputerTraining.com facilitates computer-assisted SCUBA diving.

The eDiving simulator is available for free at www.ediving.us

The DiveComputerTraining service is available at www.DiveComputerTraining.com

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From: CDNN.info

Protesters at The Hump restaurant

Whale sushi

USA — Scientific sleuths have used DNA barcoding to crack the case of the mysterious whale meat, in a tale that links a Californian sushi joint, Academy Award-winning film-makers and agents from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). More

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